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man laughing

How Funny is This? The Benefits of Laughter in the Workplace

There is no shortage of lists of how laughter can lead to successful business. I have included three of these in the bibliography, but I will summarize it in a few categories that I feel are most relevant. Let me start with a cautionary note – laughter is undeniably about context – no one wants to come across as the court jester.


makers and takers

Makers & Takers: Why Can’t We Get This Right?

In the context of the above, I have tried to pay tribute, in particular, to Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business by Rana Foroohar, which I believe is a classic when it comes to describing the dilemma. Having disclosed all this, my goal is not to bash the “bad (read taker) guy”, but to reinforce the good (read maker) guys.


vagus nerve

Can Your Vagus Nerve Stimulate Your Business Success?

Starting with a bit of history – the vagus nerve has appeared in various contexts in earlier articles. Despite these previous articles, a quick summary seems in order, especially since this topic involves so much psychological and physiological context. The vagus nerve is one of 12 cranial nerves – it being the largest. It extends from the brainstem to the abdomen by way of multiple organs, including the heart and lungs.


paradox

10 Paradoxes That Will Bite You in the Ass (1st in Series)

Perhaps the best way to illustrate how this paradox works (as in “bites you”) is with a cross section (in summary form) of (just some) of the errors/biases that I have discussed in various articles. As always, I have tried to simplify (oversimplify?) the content so as to make it quickly digestible. For example: biases are not necessarily irrational (but can still be problematic).


perspective on intuition

How Do You Interpret the World? Perspectives on Intuition

The purpose of this article is to share some additional perspectives on intuition themes that are fundamental components of individual thinking – and in particular, describe some of their limitations. Simply put, your intuition is your initial impressions of the world around you – before you ‘learn’ specific principles. They reflect both expectations (belief) and experience (perception).